Author Archives: Teresa

American War

Omar El Akkad’s debut novel is an unsettling and ingenious imaging of a U.S. Civil War in the late 21st century. The story follows the life of Sarat Chestnutt, born near the Mississippi Sea in the purple state of Louisiana. … Continue reading

Posted in Fiction, Speculative Fiction | 7 Comments

Delusions of Gender

We’ve all heard the stereotypes. Men are like …. Women are like …. And it starts early, with the assumption that gender differences are inherent and immutable. In Delusions of Gender, psychologist Cordelia Fine methodically (and sometimes snarkily) picks apart studies … Continue reading

Posted in Nonfiction | 15 Comments

The Water Knife

It took me a while to get into this book by Paolo Bacigalupi. The story follows three separate characters, each one dealing with a different aspect of the calamitous water shortages in the southwestern U.S. Angel is a “water knife,” … Continue reading

Posted in Fiction, Speculative Fiction | 2 Comments

The Core of the Sun

In the Finland of this novel by Johanna Sinisalo and translated by Lola Rogers, women are sorted during childhood into two groups: Eloi and Morlocks (named inspired by H.G. Wells). The Morlocks are the workers, free to live as they … Continue reading

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The Shuttle

Frances Hodgson Burnett is best known for her children’s novels (none of which I happen to have read). The 1907 novel The Shuttle, however, is written for adults. Its subject—an abusive marriage—is a serious one, although it’s presented in such a way … Continue reading

Posted in Classics, Fiction | 12 Comments

Borne

Rachel is a scavenger who lives in the ruins of an old apartment building with Wick, a former employee of a biotech firm called the Company. The environment is a complete wreck. Rachel spent much of her childhood as a … Continue reading

Posted in Fiction, Speculative Fiction | 4 Comments

The White Album

One of the best books I read last year was Joan Didion’s essay collection, Slouching Towards Bethlehem. I appreciated Didion’s keen observations and her blending of personal observation with commentary on the culture. It felt significant and hardly at all … Continue reading

Posted in Nonfiction, Short Stories/Essays | 7 Comments

Ill Will

When Dustin Tillman was 13 years old, his parents and his aunt and uncle were murdered. At the trial, Dustin and his cousin, Kate, testified against his adopted brother, Rusty. He claimed that Rusty was into Satanic rituals—it was the … Continue reading

Posted in Fiction, Mysteries/Crime | 11 Comments

We Were Eight Years in Power: An American Tragedy

Ta-Nehisi Coates rose to prominence as a writer largely through his articles for The Atlantic, and this collection includes nine of those articles, each drawn from a year of the Obama presidency and the year following. Through them, we can … Continue reading

Posted in Nonfiction, Short Stories/Essays | 8 Comments

Lockdown

My favorite Laurie King novels are those about Mary Russell and Sherlock Holmes, but I’ve enjoyed her standalone novels as well, so I was glad to get a copy of her new book, Lockdown through the LibraryThing Early Reviewers program even … Continue reading

Posted in Fiction, Mysteries/Crime | 4 Comments